Fred & Ginger Had Rhythm, Do You?

Fred & Ginger Had Rhythm, Do You?

We’re talking about circadian rhythm.  From the Latin circa (around) and diem (day), circadian rhythm is any biological process that displays an endogenous, entrainable oscillation of about 24-hours.  These 24-hour rhythms have been widely observed in plants and animals (including we humans).  So, while we all have an inert rhythm – why don’t we “dance” to it?

In the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the brain, we have a “clock,”  which governs when we sleep and rise, taking (in part) its cues from light sources to govern our 24-hour day.  Doctors Michael Roizen and Michael Crupain suggest in their new book, “What to Eat When,” this biological rhythm affects our digestion and hormonal levels,  and it dictates when it’s best to exercise and to eat.  In fact, they propose that “when we eat, is just as important as what we eat.”

Two weight loss studies conducted by Dr. Jakubowicz, of Tel Aviv University, include the effects of circadian rhythm.

In a 12-week study, 93 obese women, were divided into two groups.  The objective for all was to lose weight on a 1400 calorie per day diet consisting of moderate-carb and moderate-fat intake.  The food consumed was the same, except that one group’s breakfast was composed of 700 calories, lunch 500 calories, and dinner 200 calories.  Group 2 did the reverse, 200 calories at breakfast, 500 at lunch and 700 at dinner.

Everyone lost weight.  The big breakfast group lost an average of 17.8 pounds and 3 inches off their waistline. The big dinner group lost 7.3 pounds and 1.4 inches off their waistline.  The more abundant breakfast group also showed significantly lower levels of ghrelin (often referred to as the hunger hormone), and a decrease in insulin, glucose and triglyceride levels.

In another study, 193 obese, non-diabetic adults participated in a 32-week study.  Again, they were divided into two groups.  Men had 1600 calories per day, women 1400 calories.  One group had a low carbohydrate diet with a 300 calorie breakfast; the other was high in both proteins and carbohydrates and always included a dessert for breakfast.  This meal came in at 600 calories.  After the study, the group with the big breakfast lost, on average, 40 pounds more than their peers.  Part of the problem for the low carb, small breakfast group was the participants didn’t endure denial well for 32 weeks.  As mentioned in an earlier post, when faced with deprivation, one can sometimes become depraved.

While the Israeli studies results are compelling, they are supervised diets, and I wouldn’t advise something so drastic without direction from a professional.

In urban America, our days are filled with work, school, and other activities.  We leave homes at different times, not having breakfast as a family unit.  During the day, there is work, school, after-school activities, and appointments.  Our calendars are full.  At the end of the day a family, hopefully, can sit down as a unit for what is usually their largest meal.  Complicating our lives, even more, is the control technology has over us.

So I asked myself, “how can I incorporate a better “when” into my diet day?”  I figured this would be a relatively easy process.  I  was wrong.  Even following the book’s four guidelines can be problematic.  I get up early and have a substantial breakfast (which includes fat, protein and whole grains) by 8 am.  I plan lunch between 12 and 1 pm.  Dinner is my smallest meal, and I try to eat it between 5 and 6 pm.  This is fairly compatible with the guidelines.  However, keeping a consistent mealtime schedule is not as easy as I’d thought.  It’s here the adage, “make plans and life happens,” comes in to play.

The doctors also discuss what to eat when you’re experiencing stress or grief, how to handle health issues and other everyday life challenges that arise.  Importantly, they do speak to “mindful” eating.  Enjoying a meal without phone or text interruption, and eliminating television programming while dining is recommended.

There is science to aligning our circadian clock with our hunger clock.  Do you want to figure out how you can incorporate the “when” into your day?  Read “What to Eat When.”  Some suggestions may be easier to integrate into your life than others, but there is no doubt, better positioning the two rhythms can be beneficial to your well-being.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NAVIGATING THE DIET MELANGE

NAVIGATING THE DIET MELANGE

This is the time of year when diet companies and weight loss plans, make promises to transform you — producing a better, fitter, and more amazing you.  Many suggest these remarkable changes will occur almost overnight, with little or no effort.  As with anything in life, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.  I decided to do some research.  Every year U.S. News & World Reports puts out a list of the best diets.  I checked out those top rated.  Here is a link to the article:  https://health.usnews.com/best-diet/best-diets-overall.

The left-hand column of the article provides ways you can customize a diet.  There are rankings (kinds of programs), or you can modify the type of regime, as well as specific preferences you desire.

When I started on my weight loss journey, I had 2 objectives:  1) Lose weight and 2) Not ever have another heart attack.  To be honest, there is no guarantee of the second goal. The reality is I have cardiovascular disease (CVD).  After my myocardial infarction (MI), stents were inserted, and it resolved an immediate problem.  It did not take away the CVD.  For me, this is a good-news, bad-news scenario.  The bad news is I could experience (and almost did) another cardiac event, the good news is I have learned and continue to learn how to listen to my body and take better care of it.

The top 3 diets overall, at U.S. News were:  1) The Mediterranean Diet, 2) The Dash Diet, 3) The Flexitarian Diet.  In all 3 plans, you do the shopping at your local market  — there are no premade meals to buy.  While they all recommend fresh fruits and vegetables, you might consider frozen vegetables, which are generally harvested in their prime and quick-frozen.  Be sure you get the veggies without sauces, butter, etc.  Plant-based proteins are advocated (legumes, beans, nuts), but you don’t have to give up lean meat.  There are hundreds of recipes available online and cookbooks dedicated to all 3.

I was listening to Dr. Jen Ashton, the Chief Health and Medical Editor, and Chief Medical Correspondent for ABC News and Good Morning America, discuss the finding from U.S. News.  In addition to being a physician, Dr. Ashton received a Master’s Degree in Nutrition from Columbia University in 2016.  Credentials in nutrition are a rarity among physicians.  One thing Dr. Ashton emphasized is that any diet has to be “sustainable.”  If any program is not easy to follow you will likely give up.  All 3 of these diets are easy to follow.

Since a primary reason for researching diets was because of my concern over heart health, I feel compelled to mention the Ornish Diet, which tied for #1 with the Mediterranean Diet in the Heart Healthy category.  A preeminent difference between this and the Mediterranean Diet is that it is incredibly restrictive with the use of oils (even unsaturated), foods containing cholesterol, animal products, etc.  The plan emphasizes stress management and exercise in addition to diet.  Both are essential to maintaining a healthy heart.

While I don’t follow it flawlessly, my diet most resembles the Mediterranean Diet.  Hell, I am Italian after all.  Of course, if you look at the European portion of the Mediterranean Sea, it encompasses Greece, Italy, France, Turkey, and Croatia — all with different kinds of cuisine.  Yet they all share a similar pyramid.  All meals include the base (this is where most of your food will come from) encompassing fruits, grains, vegetables, beans, nuts, legumes, seeds, along with herbs and spices.  Next up on the pyramid is fish and seafood.  These you have at least 2 times per week.  Next up is poultry, eggs, cheese and yogurt which you have in moderate portions daily to weekly.  The tip of the pyramid contains meats and sweets — these foods, of course, are in limited quantities.

There is one other thing we must consider when discussing the Mediterranean Diet.  People from that region, do not hop in the car to go to the mall or market.  They walk just about everywhere or ride bikes (how un-American).  In other words, they are not couch-potatoes, they are active.  Don’t expect to lose weight, if you aren’t moving.  Think at least 30 minutes a day of moderate to vigorous exercise.  If you’ve been inactive, start off incorporating physical activity 3 days a week, increasing your workout as you can.

So there you have it.  The top diets, according to U.S. News.  There are more.  Under best weight loss diets, you can find Weight Watchers, Volumetrics Diet; Best Fast Weight Loss Diets gives us HMR Diet, Atkins Program and Keto Diet; Best Commercial Diets include Jenny Craig and Nutritarian.  OMG, it goes on and on.

There are additional charges to join many of the Weight Loss and Commercial Diet Plans, plus monthly fees.  Some have group meetings, meetings with counselors (or a combination of both) and some are available online You need to choose what works for you.  Prepared food can be purchased directly from the company or at your local market, reducing preparation time for the user.  Just remember Dr. Ashton’s advice, whatever you select, IT MUST BE SUSTAINABLE.

Early on I tried Weight Watchers and dropped it because while it offered portion control and a pretty healthy approach, I didn’t know how many macro and micronutrients I was getting per meal or per day.  Was I getting too many carbs, too much fat?  It simply didn’t follow the lifestyle of a control freak.  However, others swear by it and if it’s working for you, stick with it.

Finally, I judge my diet results, not on a number on the scale, nor a dress size.  I look at my waist size (more on this in a future post) and most importantly on lab results, and maintaining healthy blood pressure.

Our obsession with diet has created a multi-million dollar industry, which is difficult to navigate.  We need to have a “buyer beware,” sign out there as we evaluate what’s in our best interests.

What do you do?  How do you measure your success?  There was a lot to this post.  I hope I didn’t discourage you.  Let me know your thoughts.

 

Taking the Die Out of Diet!

Taking the Die Out of Diet!

“Hey, I’m depraved on account I’m deprived.” Dear Officer Krupke, West Side Story

You’ve decided it’s time.  You’ve literally eaten your way through Thanksgiving, Christmas, Hanukkah, and New Year’s.  If that wasn’t enough — you consumed enormous quantities of calories attending all those holiday parties.  You are left with a widening waistline, little or no energy, and quite often a dip in your self-esteem.

When you think of the word “diet,” what comes to mind?  How about:

  1. Low fat (or no fat)
  2. No pasta, no bread, no sweets –NO CARBS
  3. Limited calories
  4. No Alcohol
  5. Salads, salads, salads (OMG, I hate green food)
  6. Gluten-free foods — What the hell is gluten?
  7. Starvation

If you can say “Yes” to one or more of the above, you are in deprivation mode.  Trust me, that inevitably leads to becoming depraved.  An example of this kind of depravity is simple.  I do not like coconut.  I’m not fond of the aroma, the taste, or the texture of those shavings placed on top of desserts.  If I am told I cannot have coconut, I will begin to crave it.  In anticipation of expected deprivation, I become depraved!

Like many of you, I’ve tried so many weight loss plans and had little or no success.  Maybe I lost some pounds, but stop the diet, and they would miraculously reappear.  In surrender, I’d thrown my arms in the air figuring, I’d never win in the diet arena.  As I stated in my previous blog post, what finally got my attention was a heart attack.  This weight problem was no longer a vague idea of looking better, my life was on the line.

My life is so often serendipitous.  It took 2 years to find my primary physician.  Incredibly, she is board certified in obesity medicine and has more than a nodding acquaintance with nutrition.  She provides seminars for her patients which include professional dietitians, psychologists, and physical therapists.  She started me on the path of my weight loss journey.  To date, I’ve said goodbye to 35 pounds.

In addition, I’ve taken on-line nutrition courses through edtogo.com.  This does not make me an expert, but I’ve found some things that have worked for me — and that may work for you.  Perhaps you can share some of your experiences that will help other readers.

There is no “one size fits all” diet out there.  Wish there was — bet you do too.  However, sharing what’s worked and what hasn’t might give someone else a “leg-up.”

The “Food for Thought” section of my blog will include suggestions, ideas, recipes (if from another source, there will be links to them).  I hope you are as excited about this section in my blog, as I.  Let me hear from you.